get-describe-apiserver-extensions

Provide open-api extensions for kubectl get / kubectl describe columns

Status: Pending

Version: Alpha

Motivation

kubectl get and kubectl describe do not provide a rich experience for resources retrieved through federated apiservers and types not compiled into the kubectl binary. Kubectl should support printing columns configured per-type without having the types compiled in.

Proposal

Allow the apiserver to define the type specific columns that will be printed using the open-api swagger.json spec already fetched by kubectl. This provides a limited describe to only print out fields on the object and related events.

Note: This solution will only work for types compiled into the apiserver providing the open-api swagger.json to kubectl. This solution will not work for TPR, though TPR could possibly be solved in a similar way by apply an annotation with the same key / value to the TPR.

User Experience

Use Cases

  • As a user, when I run kubectl get on sig-service-catalog resources defined in a federated apiserver, I want to see more than just the name and the type of the resource.
  • As a user, when I run kubectl describe on sig-service-catalog resources defined in a federated apiserver, I want the command to succeed, and to see events for the resource along with important fields of the resource.

Implementation

Define the open-api extensions x-kubernetes-kubectl-get-columns and x-kubernetes-kubectl-describe-columns. These extensions have a string value containing the columns to be printed by kubectl. The string format is the same as the --custom-columns for kubectl get.

Apiserver

  • Populate the open-api extension value for resource types.

This is done by hardcoding the extension for types compiled into the api server. As such this is only a solution for types implemented using federated apiservers.

Kubectl

Overview:

  • In kubectl get use the x-kubernetes-kubectl-get-columns value when printing an object iff 1) it is defined and 2) the output type is “” (empty string) or “wide”.

  • In kubectl describe use the x-kubernetes-kubectl-describe-columns value when printing an object iff 1) it is defined

Option 1: Re-parse the open-api swagger.json in a kubectl library

Re-parse the open-api swagger.json schema and build a map of group version kind -> columns parsed from the schema. For this would look similar to validation/schema.go

In get.go and describe.go: After fetching the “Infos” from the resource builder, lookup the group version kind from the populated map.

Pros: - Simple and straightforward solution - Scope of impacted Kubernetes components is minimal - Doable in 1.6

Cons: - Hacky solution - Can not be cleanly extended to support TPR

Option 2: Modify api-machinery RestMapper

Modify the api-machinery RestMapper to parse extensions prefixed with x-kubernetes and include them in the RestMapping used by the resource builder.

type RESTMapping struct {
	// Resource is a string representing the name of this resource as a REST client would see it
	Resource string

	GroupVersionKind schema.GroupVersionKind

	// Scope contains the information needed to deal with REST Resources that are in a resource hierarchy
	Scope RESTScope

	runtime.ObjectConvertor
	MetadataAccessor

    // Extensions
    ApiExtensions ApiExtensions
}

type ApiExtensions struct {
  Extensions map[string]interface{}
}

The tags would then be easily accessible from the kubectl get / describe functions through: resource.Builder -> Infos -> Mapping -> DisplayOptions

Pros: - Clean + generalized solution - The same strategy can be applied to support TPR - Can support exposing future extensions such as patchStrategy and mergeKey - Can be used by other clients / tools

Cons: - Fields are only loosely tied to rest - Complicated due to the broad scope and impact - May not be doable in 1.6

Considerations

What should be used for oth an open-api extension columns tag AND a compiled in printer exist for a type?

  • Apiserver only provides describe for types that are never compiled in
    • Compiled in describe is much more rich - aggregating data across many other types. e.g. Node describe aggregating Pod data
    • kubectl will not be able to provide any describe information for new types when version skewed against a newer server
  • Always use the extensions if present
    • Allows server to control columns. Adds new columns for types on old clients that maybe missing the columns.
  • Always use the compiled in commands if present
    • The compiled in describe is richer and provides aggregated information about many types.
  • Always use the get extension if present. Always use the describe compiled in code if present.
    • Inconsistent behavior across how extensions are handled

Client/Server Backwards/Forwards compatibility

Newer client

Client doesn’t find the open-api extensions. Fallback on 1.5 behavior.

In the future, this will provide stronger backwards / forwards compatibility as it will allow clients to print objects

Newer server

Client doesn’t respect open-api extensions. Uses 1.5 behavior.

Alternatives considered

Fork Kubectl and compile in go types

Fork kubectl and compile in the go types. Implement get / describe for the new types in the forked version.

Pros: This is what will happen for sig-service catalog if we take no action in 1.6

Cons: Bad user experience. No clear solution for patching forked kubectl. User has to use a separate kubectl binary per-apiserver. Bad president.

I really don’t want this solution to be used.

Kubectl describe fully implemented in the server

Implement a sub-resource “/describe” in the apiserver. This executes the describe business logic for the object and returns either a string or json blob for kubectl to print.

Pros: Higher fidelity. Can aggregate data and fetch other objects.

Cons: Higher complexity. Requires more api changes.

Write per-type columns to kubectl.config or another local file

Support checking a local file containing per-type information including the columns to print.

Pros: Simplest solution. Easy for user to override values.

Cons: Requires manual configuration on user side. Does not provide a consistent experience across clients.

Write per-type go templates to kubectl.config or another local file

Support checking a local file containing per-type information including the go template.

Pros: Higher fidelity. Easy for user to override values.

Cons: Higher complexity. Requires manual configuration on user side. Does not provide a consistent experience across clients.